Judaism
“You must accept the truth from whatever source it comes.”
(Maimonides)
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Pirkei Avot: Benefits of Listening to the Elderly

The young man walks faster than the old man, but it is the old man who knows the way. (African proverb)   Anthropologists claim that even in prehistoric times wisdom and experience were left as a legacy by the oldest of the clan who, like a lamp, continued to illuminate the path of their descendants…

The rainbow, a Sign of Peace in the Bible

In the story of the Genesis of the Bible, GOD, after generating the flood to wash away the corruption of humanity, placed the rainbow in the sky as a sign of his Covenant with man. The moral decay of human civilization had reached unimaginable levels, so GOD “regretted having made man on earth and grieved…

Psalm 1

Hebrew-עִבְרִית  ; traslitteration ; NKJVt-ASH   אַ֥שְֽׁרֵי־ הָאִ֗ישׁ אֲשֶׁ֤ר ׀ לֹ֥א הָלַךְ֮ בַּעֲצַ֪ת רְשָׁ֫עִ֥ים וּבְדֶ֣רֶךְ חַ֭טָּאִים לֹ֥א עָמָ֑ד וּבְמוֹשַׁ֥ב לֵ֝צִ֗ים לֹ֣א יָשָֽׁב׃ ‘ashrêy-hâ’iysh ‘asher lo’ hâlakh baatsath reshâiym ubhedherekh chathâ’iym lo’ `âmâdh ubhemoshabh lêtsiym lo’ yâshâbh 1 Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stands in the…

What Egypt and the Song of the Sea represent

The sages of the Jewish tradition say that: “In all generations every person is obliged to consider themselves as if they had come out of Egypt”, and the Passover holiday is the commemoration of this “passage” towards freedom. In addition to traditional Jewish belief, Christians emphasize this liberation with the passage from the earthly life…

The Book of Tanya תניא: The collection of statements

The name Tanya תניא comes from Aramaic and means “what was taught”, this word is the first present in the Jewish mystical text Likkutei Amarim (ליקוטי אמרים “collection of statements”) written in 1797 by Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, founder of the Chabad movement. Content Tanya deals with spirituality and psychology from the point of…

The World’s foundation stone

The Foundation Stone (in Hebrew: אבן השתייה “ha-Shtiyya” or סֶּלַע Selā‛, in Arabic: الصخرة al-Sakhrah al-Musharrafah “The Noble Rock”) is the name of the rock at the centre of the Dome of the Rock in the Temple of Jerusalem. This solid and compact rock of enormous dimensions has a small opening in the southeast corner…

HaShem (“the Name”)

HaShem (in Hebrew: השם) is a term that literally means “The Name”. It is used to avoid referring to the Name of GOD. It is also used to avoid writing the word YHWH (formed by the Hebrew letters yod hei vav hei), and with the word ADONAI which is used only in prayers, songs and…

Jesus the Nazarene, not “from” Nazareth

The Gospel according to Matthew is the oldest text of the New Testament translated directly from Aramaic (the language spoken in Galilee at the time of Jesus) to modern times. The translation of the Septuagint (LXX) into Classical Greek, however, was the cause of one of the greatest misunderstandings in the history of Christianity, according…

5 comforting quotes about Isaiah’s prophecy

Words of comfort and consolation for the people of GOD, for our suffering during the exile from the promised land that in the past was identified in Israel, but today it can be considered as the achievement of the era of peace, the messianic era. Here are five of the best passages of this prophecy…

Cassino: The Gate of Ancient Rome

Cassino is an Italian municipality in the province of Frosinone, southern Lazio, is the second largest city in the province by number of inhabitants (about 40.000). For centuries it remained the administrative center of the Land of Saint Benedict, and, for being the birthplace of many holy men, its area is still today called the…

The reasons why I won’t Baptize nor Circumcise my son at birt

Baptism and circumcision (in hebrew brit milah “covenant of circumcision” בְּרִית מִילָה ) are nowadays considered by most believers to be a mandatory passage, almost a gateway to access the Kingdom of GOD, but what do the Holy Scriptures really say about it? Two of the greatest Patriarchs, Adam and Noah, were not circumcised, nor…

Can the Commandments of GOD be summarized?

Talmud enumerates a total of 613 Commandments (read the post about the mitzvot) in the Torah, and in this article we will try to make a general summary of the fundamental content of these Precepts accordind to the Prophets teachings. The Oral teaching tradition helps us, the Holy Scriptures tries to capture the essence of…

613 Mitzvot: The list of all the commandments contained in the Holy Scriptures

According to the Jewish tradition, the Holy Scriptures enumerates in total 613 commandments (in Hebrew language  מצוות‎romanized: mitzvot) The Talmud tells us (Tractate Makkot 23b) that there are 613 commandments in the Torah (Pentateuch for Christians): 248 Positive Commandments and 365 Negative Commandments, however, it does not provide us with a list. The number of…

Jew Nobel Prize percentage

Nobel Prizes have been awarded to over 900 individuals, of whom at least 20% were Jews, although the Jewish population comprises less than 0.2% of the world’s population. Jews have been recipients of all six awards. The first Jewish recipient, Adolf von Baeyer, was awarded the prize in Chemistry in 1905. As of 2018, the…

Jewish and Christian Passover: Origins and differences

Two sister religions, such as Judaism and Christianity, could not but have among their most important holidays two absolutely similar traditions. Jewish Passover celebrates the passage (Hebrew פסח ; Greek pascha ; Aramaic pasah or “to pass over”) from slavery in Egypt to freedom in the Promised Land. The Christian tradition, together with this “transition” towards…

Good Friday: The greatest Sacrifice

Good Friday is the day that marks the crucifixion of Jesus the Nazarene (also titled as Christ), after he was sentenced to death for claiming to be the Son of GOD. Good Friday is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday, or Easter Friday, one of the most important festivals celebrated by Christians all…

The Third and Last Temple of Jerusalem

The Third Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש השלישי‎, Beit haMikdash haShlishi, literally: “The Holy Third House“) would be the third Temple in Jerusalem, after the rebuilt of the first (Solomon’s Temple) and Second Temple. It will be the Temple of the “One GOD” of Jewish people and mentioned in Holy Texts of the Abramitic Religions. Prophesied…

Kaddish קדיש

The Kaddish or Qaddish (Aramaic: קדיש‎, qaddiš “holy”; alternative spelling: Ḳaddish) is a hymn of praises to GOD found in Jewish prayer services. The central theme of Kaddish is the exaltation, the magnification and the sanctification of of GOD’s Name, continuing with the wish of the imminent coming of the Messiah (the anointed one). The…

Psalm 26

א 1 Of David. Judge me, Oh LORD, for I have walked with sincerity, and I trusted in the LORD; I shall not falter. לְדָוִ֨ד | שָׁפְטֵ֬נִי יְהֹוָ֗ה כִּֽי־אֲ֖נִי בְּתֻמִּ֣י הָלַ֑כְתִּי וּבַֽיהֹוָ֥ה בָּ֜טַ֗חְתִּי לֹ֣א אֶמְעָֽד 1 א Vindicate me, LORD, for I have led a blameless life; I have trusted in the LORD and have not faltered….

Psalm 32

  1 א Of David, a maskil[1] – Praiseworthy is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is concealed. לדוד משכיל אשרי נשוי־פשע כסוי חטאה׃ 1 א Blessed is the one whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered. ב 2 Praiseworthy is the man to whom the LORD ascribes no iniquity and in whose…

Flavius Josephus: Prophet, roman soldier and great historian

Josephus (Jerusalem, ca. 37-38 AD – Rome, about 100 AD) was a Roman religious, writer, historian, politician and military from Jewish origin, and of priestly caste. It is very important to study his writings as it remains today the first historical source that reports in detail the events that occurred in the Holy Land in…

Ignatius of Antioch: Meal to the beasts, reaching GOD

Ignatius of Antioch (Greek: Ἰγνάτιος Ἀντιοχείας, Ignátios Antiokheías; c. 35  – c. 107), also known as Ignatius Theophorus (Ιγνάτιος ὁ Θεοφόρος, Ignátios ho Theophóros, lit. “the GOD-bearing”) or Ignatius Nurono (lit. “The fire-bearer”), was an early Christian writer and bishop of Antioch (As the successor of Saint Peter). En route to Rome, where he met his martyrdom,…

Matthew and his Gospel: Tax collector, well educated, Levite Jew and Apostole

Matthew the Apostle (Hebrew: מַתִּתְיָהוּ‎ Mattityahu or מתי‬ Matt, متى Arabic “Gift of YHVH“; Greek: Ματθαῖος; Coptic: ⲙⲁⲧⲑⲉⲟⲥ, Matthaios; also known as Saint Matthew and as Levi) was, according to the Christian Bible, one of the twelve apostles of the Master (“Rabbi”) Jesus and, according to Christian tradition, one of the four Evangelists. In the…

Amen: Behind the word and meaning

The word amen or ameen (in Hebrew אָמֵן, Greek ἀμήν, Arabic آمِينَ) can be traslated with “truth” or “truly”. The specific Hebrew word amen (’amen ) appears to be derived from a related verb ’aman , which means “he confirmed, supported, or upheld.” This verb is also associated with the Hebrew word for truth (’emet…

Praise be to GOD: Alleluia and AlhamduLILLAH

Praise be to GOD is used to express happiness or relief when something good happen. (example: “You made it here safely. Praise be to GOD). Jews, Christians and Muslims have a very similar yet very different traditions, in all three Faiths the expression is very weel known. Jew and Christian Tradition: Hallelujah is an English…

20 Prophets that everybody should know

The Prophet is an individual regarded as being in contact with a Divine Being and said to speak on that Entity’s behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people. The Message that the Prophet conveys is called a prophecy, which transports a Message beyond…

Zohar: the Book of Splendor

The Zohar (Hebrew: זֹהַר‬, lit. “Splendor” or “Radiance”) is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah. It is a group of books including commentary on the mystical aspects of the Torah (the five books of Moses) and scriptural interpretations as well as material on mysticism, mythical cosmogony, and mystical…

Melchizedek: King of righteousness

Melchizedek, Melkisetek, or Malki Tzedek (/mɛlˈkɪzədɛk/; Hebrew: מַלְכִּי־צֶדֶֿק‬ malkī-ṣeḏeq, “king of righteousness”), was the King of Salem and priest of El Elyon (“GOD Most High”) mentioned in the 14th chapter of the Book of Genesis. He brings out bread and wine and blesses Abram and El Elyon, Elohim. Chazalic literature—specifically Targum Jonathan, Targum Yerushalmi, and…

The Golden Gate of the Holy City of Jerusalem

The Golden Gate, is the only eastern gate of the Temple Mount and one of only two that used to offer access into the city from that side. It has been walled up since medieval times. The date of its construction is disputed and no archaeological work is allowed at the gatehouse, but opinions are…

Kotel: Western Wall

The Western Wall, Wailing Wall or Kotel (Hebrew: הַכֹּתֶל הַמַּעֲרָבִי‎, translit.: HaKotel HaMa’aravi; Ashkenazic pronunciation: HaKosel HaMa’arovi; Arabic: حائط البراق‎‎, translit.: Ḥā’iṭ al-Burāq, translat.: the Buraq Wall, or Arabic: المبكى‎‎ al-Mabkā: the Place of Weeping) is an ancient limestone wall in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is a relatively small segment of a far…

Jerusalem: The Holy City

Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‎  Yerushalayim; Arabic: القُدس‎‎  al-Quds [“The Holy”]) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. Israelis and Palestinians both claim Jerusalem as their capital, as the State of Israel maintains its primary governmental institutions there while the State of…

Gilgul: The concept of reincarnation according to the Jewish Kabbalah

Gilgul or also Gilgul neshamot or Gilgulai Ha Neshamot (in Hebrew גלגול הנשמות, Plural: Gilgulim; “cycle” in Hebrew נשמות, nesahmot, “souls”, “cycle of souls”) is the concept of reincarnation, or to be more accurate the transmigration (life-death-rebirth) of the souls according to the Hebrew Kabbalah. From the Jewish mystics of the ancient world there are…

Shemà שְׁמַע

Shema Yisrael (or Sh’ma Yisrael; Hebrew: שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל‎; “Hear, [Oh] Israel”) are the first two words of a section of the Torah, and is the title (sometimes shortened to simply Shema) of a prayer that serves as a centerpiece of the morning and evening Jewish prayer services. The first verse encapsulates the monotheistic essence of…

The Guide for the Perplexed

The Guide for the Perplexed (Hebrew: מורה נבוכים, Moreh Nevukhim; Arabic: دلالة الحائرين, dalālat al-ḥā’irīn, דלאל̈ה אלחאירין) is one of the three major works of Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, primarily known either as Maimonides, in the West, or by the acronym Rambam (Hebrew: רמב”ם‎‎ – for “Rabbeynu Mosheh Ben Maimon“, “Our Rabbi Moses Son of…

Talmud: The Hebrew Oral Teachings

The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד‎ talmūd “instruction, learning”, from a root LMD “teach, study”) is a central text of Rabbinic Judaism. It is also traditionally referred to as Shas (ש״ס‎), a Hebrew abbreviation of shisha sedarim, the “six orders”, a reference to the six orders of the Mishnah. The term “Talmud” normally refers to the collection…

Temple Mount

The Temple Mount (Hebrew: הַר הַבַּיִת‎‎, Har HaBáyit, “Mount of the House [of GOD, i.e. the Temple]”), known to Muslims as the Haram esh-Sharif (Arabic: الحرم الشريف‎‎, al-Ḥaram al-Šarīf, “the Noble Sanctuary”, or الحرم القدسي الشريف, al-Ḥaram al-Qudsī al-Šarīf, “the Noble Sanctuary of Jerusalem”), a hill located in the Old City of Jerusalem, is the…

Aliyah: Law of Return

The Aliyah or Law of Return (Hebrew: חֹוק הַשְׁבוּת‎, ḥok ha-shvūt) is Israeli legislation, passed on 5 July 1950, which gives Jews the right to live in Israel and to gain Israeli citizenship. In 1970, the right of entry and settlement was extended to people with one Jewish grandparent and non-Jewish people who were married…

Kabbalah

Kabbalah (in Hebrew קַבָּלָה‎ literally “parallel/corresponding,” or “received tradition”) is an esoteric  method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism is called a Mekubbal (מְקוּבָּל‎). Kabbalah’s definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism,…

Wandering Jew

The Wandering Jew is a legendary immortal man whose story began to spread in Europe during the early Middle Ages. The original legend concerns a Jew who taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion and was then cursed to walk the Earth until the Second Coming of the Messiah. The exact nature of the…

Shavuot (Pentecost)

 Shavuot (or Shovuos), in Ashkenazi usage; Shavuʿoth in Sephardi and Mizrahi Hebrew (Hebrew: שבועות‎‎, lit. “Weeks”), known as the Feast of Weeks in English and as Pentecost (Πεντηκοστή) in Ancient Greek, is a Jewish holiday that occurs on the sixth day of the Hebrew month of Sivan (may fall between 14 May–15 June). Shavuot has…

Mount Zion

Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן‎‎ Tsiyyon), also transliterated Sion, or Sayon, Syon, Tzion and Tsion, is a place name often used as a synonym for Jerusalem. The word is first found in 2 Samuel 5:7 which dates from c.630–540 BC according to modern scholarship. It commonly referred to a specific mountain near Jerusalem (Mount Zion), on which…

Misanthropy

Misanthropy is the general hatred, distrust or contempt of the human species or human nature. A misanthrope or misanthropist is someone who holds such views or feelings. The word’s origin is from the Greek words μῖσος (misos, “hatred”) and ἄνθρωπος (anthrōpos, “man, human”). The condition is often confused with asociality. A misanthrope is a person…

Bible translations

The Bible has been translated into many languages from the originals biblical languages: mainly Hebrew but also some Books in Aramaic for the Old Testament (Tanakh) and Greek for the New Testament (Septuaginta, LXX) The Latin version (translated from Greek to Latin) Vulgate was dominant in Western Christianity through the Middle Ages. Since then, the…

Passover (Pesach)

Passover, Easter or Pesach (from Hebrew פֶּסַח‎ Pesah), is an important, biblically derived holiday. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by GOD from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the “Passover” (“Passage”) from slavery to freedom as the Book of…

Abrahamic Religions: Similarity & Comparision

Abrahamic Religions counts 3.4 billion believers in today’s World (more then 50% of the entire population) and are spread widely around the World apart from the regions around East and Southeast Asia. Those monotheistic religions of West Asian origin, emphasizing and tracing their common origin to the Patriarch Abraham and mostrly of their Holy Scriptures…

Number 7 in Holy Scriptures

Seven is one of the greatest power numbers in the Abrahamic Religion startion with Judaism, representing Creation, good fortune, and blessing. A Hebrew word for luck, gad, equals seven in gematria. Another Hebrew word for luck, mazal, equals 77. The Bible is replete with things grouped in sevens. Besides the Creation and the exalted status…

Primo Levi

Primo Michele Levi (31 July 1919 – 11 April 1987) was an Italian Jewish chemist, writer, and Holocaust survivor. He was the author of several books, novels, collections of short stories, essays, and poems. His best-known works include If This Is a Man (1947) (U.S.: Survival in Auschwitz), his account of the year he spent…

YHWH: The Biblical Tetragrammaton

Related Posts: GOD – ADONAI – ALLAH The tetragrammaton (from Greek Τετραγράμματον, meaning “[consisting of] four letters”) is the four Hebrew letters יהוה‎, commonly transliterated into Latin letters as YHWH. It is one of the names of GOD used in the Bible. The name may be derived from a verb that means “to be”, “to…

Abraham

Abraham (Hebrew: אַבְרָהָם, Avraham ; Arabic: إبراهيم‎‎, Ibrāhīm), originally Abram, is the Patriarch of the Abramitic Religion (and first of the three Patriarchs of Judaism). His story features in the Holy Books of all the Abrahamic religions and Abraham plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The biblical…

Messiah

In Abrahamic religions, the Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. Māšîaḥ‎), Christ (Greek: Χριστός, translit. Khristós), or Al-Masih (Arabic: المسيح‎‎, ISO 233: mahdī) is the one chosen to lead the World and thereby save it. The concepts of Moshiach, Messianism, and Messianic Age grew from Isaiah’s writings (4:2 & ch 11) during the latter half of the 8th…

Messianic Age

The Messianic Age (sometimes refered as Golden Age)is a theological term referring to a future time of universal peace and brotherhood on the Earth, without crime, war and poverty. Many religions (including all the Abrahamic Religions) believe that there will be such an Age; some refer to it as the consummate “Kingdom of GOD”, “Paradise…

Kippah

A yarmulke (Yiddish) or Kippah (Hebrew) is a small cloth cap worn by Jews. Traditionally it was worn only by men, but in modern times the push for equality between the sexes in the practice of Judaism has led some women to wear yarmulkes. Some Jews only wear yarmulkes while praying; others wear yarmulkes the…

GOD

Related Articles: ALLAH ADONAI YHWH In monotheism, GOD is conceived of as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith. The concept of GOD, as described by most theologians, includes the attributes of omniscience (infinite knowledge), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. Many theologians also…

December 25th: Conventional day of the birth of Jesus Christ

One of the most important Christian Holyday is Christmas, the day that remember the birth of Jesus the Nazarene. The night between 24th and 25th December has been used conventionally (about 300 years after Jesus’ death) as day of the birth of Jesus and introduced into Christian ritual. Studying the Scriptures of the New Testament…

ADONAI

The Name of GOD used most often in the Hebrew Bible is the Tetragrammaton YHWH (Hebrew: יהוה‎‎). It is frequently anglicized as Jehovah and Yahweh and written in most English editions of the Bible as “the LORD” owing to the Jewish tradition of reading it as ADONAI (“My LORD” even if the form is plural…

Tenth – Ma’aser

Maaser means “a tenth.” It’s based on the Hebrew word eser, or ten. As a rule, it refers to donating ten percent of whatever to whomever. While ma’aser may seem like a lot of giving, it’s actually all about receiving. Just like sacrifices, which primarily benefit those who bring them, giving ma’aser whips you into spiritual…

Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

Yom Kippur (Hebrew: יוֹם כִּיפּוּר or יום הכיפורים), also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year in Judaism. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jewish people traditionally observe this holy day with an approximate 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services….

Jesus

Jesus (from Greek: Ἰησοῦς, translit. Iesous; Hebrew: ישוע‎, translit. Yēšū́aʿ, lit. ‘Yeshua; “YHWH saves”‎; c. 4 BC – c. AD 30), also referred to as Jesus Christ, was a Jewish preacher and religious leader who has become the central figure of Christianity. Christians believe him to be the Son of GOD and the awaited Messiah…

Hillel The Elder

Hillel (Hebrew: הלל; variously called Hillel HaGadol, or Hillel HaZaken, Hillel HaBavli or HaBavli,. was born according to tradition in Babylon c. 110 BCE, died 10 CE in Jerusalem) was a famous Jewish religious leader, one of the most important figures in Jewish history. He is associated with the development of the Mishnah and the Talmud. Renowned within Judaism…

Jubilee

The Jubilee (Hebrew יובל yūḇāl) year is the year at the end of seven cycles of shmita (Sabbatical years), and according to Biblical regulations had a special impact on the ownership and management of land in the Land of Israel; there is some debate whether it was the 49th year (the last year of seven…

Holy Scriptures

Religious texts, also known as Scripture, Scriptures, Holy Writ, or Holy Books, are the Texts which various Religious traditions consider to be sacred, or central to their religious tradition. Many religions and spiritual movements believe that their sacred texts are divinely or supernaturally revealed or inspired. History of religious texts The oldest known religious text…

Judaism

Judaism (from Latin: Iudaismus, derived from Greek Ἰουδαϊσμός, originally from Hebrew יהודה, Yehudah, “Judah”; in Hebrew: יהדות, Yahadut, the distinctive characteristics of the Judean ethnos) encompasses the religion, philosophy, culture and way of life of the Jewish people. Judaism is an ancient monotheistic religion, with the Torah as its foundational Text (part of the larger…

TaNaKh

The Tanakh (Hebrew: תַּנַ”ךְ‎, pronounced [taˈnaχ] or [təˈnax]; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach) or Mikra is the canon of the Hebrew Bible. The traditional Hebrew text is known as the Masoretic Text. Tanakh is an acronym of the first Hebrew letter of each of the Masoretic Text’s three traditional subdivisions: Torah (“Teaching”, also known as the…

Apocryphal Scriptures

Apocrypha are works, usually written works, that are of unknown authorship, or of doubtful authenticity, or spurious, or not considered to be within a particular canon. The word is properly treated as a plural, but in common usage is often singular. In the context of the Jewish and Christian Bibles, where most texts are of…

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