Augustine of Hippo (Quotes)

It was pride that turned angels into devils; it is humility that makes men equal to angels.


You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


Love the sinner and hate the sin.
(St. Augustine, Opera Omnia)


The desire for fame tempts even noble minds.
(St. Augustine, The City of God)


The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.


The Bible was composed in such a way that as beginners mature, its meaning grows with them.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


The punishment of every disordered mind is its own disorder.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


He who sings prays twice.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


How can the past and future be, when the past no longer is, and the future is not yet? As for the present, if it were always present and never moved on to become the past, it would not be time, but eternity.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


Do not believe yourself healthy. Immortality is health; this life is a long sickness.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


Don’t hold yourselves cheap, seeing that the creator of all things and of you estimates your value so high, so dear, that he pours out for you every day the most precious blood of his only-begotten Son.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


Carnal lust rules where there is no love of God.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


 Anger is a weed; hate is the tree.
(St. Augustine
, Sermons)


Bad times, hard times, this is what people keep saying; but let us live well, and times shall be good. We are the times: Such as we are, such are the times.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient and ever new! Late have I loved you! And, behold, you were within me, and I out of myself, and there I searched for you.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


The good man, though a slave, is free; the wicked, though he reigns, is a slave.
(St. Augustine, City of God)


We were ensnared by the wisdom of the serpent; we are set free by the foolishness of God.
(St. Augustine, De doctrina christiana)


 What art Thou then, my God? what, but the Lord God? For who is Lord but the Lord? or who is God save our God? Most highest, most good, most potent, most omnipotent; most merciful, yet most just; most hidden, yet most present; most beautiful, yet most strong; stable, yet incomprehensible; unchangeable, yet all-changing; never new, never old; all-renewing, and bringing age upon the proud, and they know it not; ever working, ever at rest; still gathering, yet nothing lacking; supporting, filling, and overspreading; creating, nourishing, and maturing; seeking, yet having all things.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


Because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true; nor because it is uttered with stammering lips should it be supposed false.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


But just a minute, Mr. Poor Man; consider whether you can, in fact, enter. What if you’re poor, and also happen to be greedy? What if you’re sunk in destitution, and at the same time on fire with avarice? So if that’s what you’re like, whoever you are that are poor, it’s not because you haven’t wanted to be rich, but because you haven’t been able to. So God doesn’t inspect your means, but he observes your will.
ST. AUGUSTINE, Sermons


Humility is the foundation of all the other virtues: hence, in the soul in which this virtue does not exist there cannot be any other virtue except in mere appearance.
(St. Augustine, attributed, Michael Oren Fitzgerald’s Christian Spirit)


I will pass then beyond this power of my nature also, rising by degrees unto Him Who made me.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


If there is something more excellent than the truth, then that is God; if not, then truth itself is God.
(St. Augustine, De Libero Arbitrio)


For if a thing is not diminished by being shared with others, it is not rightly owned if it is only owned and not shared.
(St. Augustine, De doctina christiana)


God judged it better to bring good out of evil than to suffer no evil to exist.
(St. Augustine, Enchridion)


For God loves saving, not condemning, and therefore He is patient with bad people, in order to make good people out of bad people.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


Venerate the martyrs, praise, love, proclaim, honor them. But worship the God of the martyrs.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


People travel to wonder at the height of mountains, at the huge waves of the sea, at the long courses of rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars; and they pass by themselves without wondering.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


So if you can manage it, you shouldn’t touch your partner, except for the sake of having children.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


 Understanding is the reward of faith.


Behold, these things pass away, that others may replace them, and so this lower universe be completed by all his parts.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


There is no salvation outside the church.
(St. Augustine, De Baptismo)


Will is to grace as the horse is to the rider.
(St. Augustine, De Libero Arbitrio)


And how shall I call upon my God, my God and Lord, since, when I call for Him, I shall be calling Him to myself? and what room is there within me, whither my God can come into me? whither can God come into me, God who made heaven and earth? is there, indeed, O Lord my God, aught in me that can contain thee?
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


Free curiosity has greater power to stimulate learning than rigorous coercion.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


The mind commands the body and is instantly obeyed. The mind commands itself and meets resistance.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


I became evil for no reason. I had no motive for my wickedness except wickedness itself. It was foul, and I loved it. I loved the self-destruction, I loved my fall, not the object for which I had fallen but my fall itself. My depraved soul leaped down from your firmament to ruin. I was seeking not to gain anything by shameful means, but shame for its own sake.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


It is as if he should feel that there is an enemy who could be more destructive to himself than that hatred which excites him against his fellow man; or that he could destroy him whom he hates more completely than he destroys his own soul by this same hatred.
(St. Augustine, Confessions)


The good Christian should beware of astrologers. The danger already exists that astrologers have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and confine man in the bonds of Hell.
(St. Augustine, On Genesis)


We make a ladder of our vices, if we trample those same vices underfoot.
(St. Augustine, Sermons)


 

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