Christianity
The most enjoyable feeling? Inner peace
The best welcoming? A smile.
The best medicine? Optimism
The greatest satisfaction? The duty accomplished
The greatest strength? Faith
The most beautiful thing in the world? Love.
(Mother Teresa)
Statue of Mother Teresa
Jerusalem's Cross
Holy Scriptures
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The rainbow, a Sign of Peace in the Bible

In the story of the Genesis of the Bible, GOD, after generating the flood to wash away the corruption of humanity, placed the rainbow in the sky as a sign of his Covenant with man. The moral decay of human civilization had reached unimaginable levels, so GOD “regretted having made man on earth and grieved…

Psalm 1

Hebrew-עִבְרִית  ; traslitteration ; NKJVt-ASH   אַ֥שְֽׁרֵי־ הָאִ֗ישׁ אֲשֶׁ֤ר ׀ לֹ֥א הָלַךְ֮ בַּעֲצַ֪ת רְשָׁ֫עִ֥ים וּבְדֶ֣רֶךְ חַ֭טָּאִים לֹ֥א עָמָ֑ד וּבְמוֹשַׁ֥ב לֵ֝צִ֗ים לֹ֣א יָשָֽׁב׃ ‘ashrêy-hâ’iysh ‘asher lo’ hâlakh baatsath reshâiym ubhedherekh chathâ’iym lo’ `âmâdh ubhemoshabh lêtsiym lo’ yâshâbh 1 Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stands in the…

Gospel according to Matthew

The Gospel according to Matthew is the first book of the New Testament of the Christian Canon and one of the three synoptic gospels. It tells of how Jesus, the Messiah of Israel, was rejected and executed by the Israeli authorities of his time. The Messiah pronounces a judgment on sinners and wicked leaders of…

The World’s foundation stone

The Foundation Stone (in Hebrew: אבן השתייה “ha-Shtiyya” or סֶּלַע Selā‛, in Arabic: الصخرة al-Sakhrah al-Musharrafah “The Noble Rock”) is the name of the rock at the centre of the Dome of the Rock in the Temple of Jerusalem. This solid and compact rock of enormous dimensions has a small opening in the southeast corner…

Jesus the Nazarene, not “from” Nazareth

The Gospel according to Matthew is the oldest text of the New Testament translated directly from Aramaic (the language spoken in Galilee at the time of Jesus) to modern times. The translation of the Septuagint (LXX) into Classical Greek, however, was the cause of one of the greatest misunderstandings in the history of Christianity, according…

Cassian’s Spiritual Conferences: Learning from the experience of our ancestors

Jhon Cassian c. AD 360 – c. 435), also known as John the Ascetic and John Cassian the Roman (Latin: Ioannes Eremita Cassianus, Ioannus Cassianus, or Ioannes Massiliensis), was a Christian monk and theologian celebrated in both the Western and Eastern churches for his mystical writings. Cassian is noted for his role in bringing the ideas and practices…

Cassino: The Gate of Ancient Rome

Cassino is an Italian municipality in the province of Frosinone, southern Lazio, is the second largest city in the province by number of inhabitants (about 40.000). For centuries it remained the administrative center of the Land of Saint Benedict, and, for being the birthplace of many holy men, its area is still today called the…

The reasons why I won’t Baptize nor Circumcise my son at birt

Baptism and circumcision (in hebrew brit milah “covenant of circumcision” בְּרִית מִילָה ) are nowadays considered by most believers to be a mandatory passage, almost a gateway to access the Kingdom of GOD, but what do the Holy Scriptures really say about it? Two of the greatest Patriarchs, Adam and Noah, were not circumcised, nor…

Can the Commandments of GOD be summarized?

Talmud enumerates a total of 613 Commandments (read the post about the mitzvot) in the Torah, and in this article we will try to make a general summary of the fundamental content of these Precepts accordind to the Prophets teachings. The Oral teaching tradition helps us, the Holy Scriptures tries to capture the essence of…

Jewish and Christian Passover: Origins and differences

Two sister religions, such as Judaism and Christianity, could not but have among their most important holidays two absolutely similar traditions. Jewish Passover celebrates the passage (Hebrew פסח ; Greek pascha ; Aramaic pasah or “to pass over”) from slavery in Egypt to freedom in the Promised Land. The Christian tradition, together with this “transition” towards…

Good Friday: The greatest Sacrifice

Good Friday is the day that marks the crucifixion of Jesus the Nazarene (also titled as Christ), after he was sentenced to death for claiming to be the Son of GOD. Good Friday is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday, or Easter Friday, one of the most important festivals celebrated by Christians all…

Palm Sunday: The historical truth

Palm Sunday according to Christian tradition is the Sunday before Easter. On this day it is remembered the entry into Jerusalem of Jesus, celebrated by the crowds waving palm branches (Gospel according to John Cap. 12, 12-15). The multitude assembled from the rumors of the Messiah’s arrival, to honor him, laid capes and palm leaves…

The Third and Last Temple of Jerusalem

The Third Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש השלישי‎, Beit haMikdash haShlishi, literally: “The Holy Third House“) would be the third Temple in Jerusalem, after the rebuilt of the first (Solomon’s Temple) and Second Temple. It will be the Temple of the “One GOD” of Jewish people and mentioned in Holy Texts of the Abramitic Religions. Prophesied…

Mary mother of Jesus: Quoted more times in the Quran than the New Testament

Mary (in Hebrew: מרים, Myrhiàm; Aramaic: Maryām; Greek: Μαριάμ Mariam, Μαρία / Μαρίη María; Arabic: مريم, Maryam), also called Mary of Nazareth, is the virgin mother of Jesus. Venerated both by Christians (for the Orthodox, Θεοτόκος Theotókos), its sanctity is however also recognized by the Anglican Communion, the Protestant confessions (Lutheran), but also substantially in…

Nazareth: The mystery of the city of the Nazarenes

A great mystery surround the origin of one of the most important cities of Christianity, Nazareth. The New Testament reports that the city of origin of Jesus was (according to the original Text in Greek) the “polis Natzoree“, which was translated as “City of Nazareth”: And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent…

Girolamo Savonarola: burnt by the order of the Pope, then sanctified 500 years later

Girolamo Maria Francesco Matteo Savonarola [full name] (Ferrara, 21 September 1452 – Florence, 23 May 1498) was an Italian religious, politician and preacher. Belonging to the order of the Dominican friars O.P., he prophesied disasters for Florence and Italy advocating a theocratic model for the Florentine Republic established after the expulsion of the Medici. In…

Psalm 26

א 1 Of David. Judge me, Oh LORD, for I have walked with sincerity, and I trusted in the LORD; I shall not falter. לְדָוִ֨ד | שָׁפְטֵ֬נִי יְהֹוָ֗ה כִּֽי־אֲ֖נִי בְּתֻמִּ֣י הָלַ֑כְתִּי וּבַֽיהֹוָ֥ה בָּ֜טַ֗חְתִּי לֹ֣א אֶמְעָֽד 1 א Vindicate me, LORD, for I have led a blameless life; I have trusted in the LORD and have not faltered….

Psalm 32

  1 א Of David, a maskil[1] – Praiseworthy is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is concealed. לדוד משכיל אשרי נשוי־פשע כסוי חטאה׃ 1 א Blessed is the one whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered. ב 2 Praiseworthy is the man to whom the LORD ascribes no iniquity and in whose…

Flavius Josephus: Prophet, roman soldier and great historian

Josephus (Jerusalem, ca. 37-38 AD – Rome, about 100 AD) was a Roman religious, writer, historian, politician and military from Jewish origin, and of priestly caste. It is very important to study his writings as it remains today the first historical source that reports in detail the events that occurred in the Holy Land in…

The Christian Christmas and its origins: nobody knows the birth date of Jesus Christ

It would really be a shame not to celebrate Christmas for a Christian. This event is among the most joyful and healthy occasions in Western culture (even “imitated” by the Jewish brothers with the “twin” and not reported in the Torah, of Hannukkah), and also because this hymn to peace and family unity has truly…

Ignatius of Antioch: Meal to the beasts, reaching GOD

Ignatius of Antioch (Greek: Ἰγνάτιος Ἀντιοχείας, Ignátios Antiokheías; c. 35  – c. 107), also known as Ignatius Theophorus (Ιγνάτιος ὁ Θεοφόρος, Ignátios ho Theophóros, lit. “the GOD-bearing”) or Ignatius Nurono (lit. “The fire-bearer”), was an early Christian writer and bishop of Antioch (As the successor of Saint Peter). En route to Rome, where he met his martyrdom,…

Rastafari: The Abrahamic faith that use Marijuana

Rastafari or Rastafarianism is an Abrahamic religion that has its roots in the Hebrew Holy Scriptures. They worship the One GOD, GOD of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and recognize, according to their reference standard, the Bible, identifying primarily with the Ethiopian Orthodox Christian Church. Rastas refer to their beliefs, which are based on a specific…

Matthew and his Gospel: Tax collector, well educated, Levite Jew and Apostole

Matthew the Apostle (Hebrew: מַתִּתְיָהוּ‎ Mattityahu or מתי‬ Matt, متى Arabic “Gift of YHVH“; Greek: Ματθαῖος; Coptic: ⲙⲁⲧⲑⲉⲟⲥ, Matthaios; also known as Saint Matthew and as Levi) was, according to the Christian Bible, one of the twelve apostles of the Master (“Rabbi”) Jesus and, according to Christian tradition, one of the four Evangelists. In the…

John Chrysostom: The “golden-mouthed”, man of GOD and teologician

John Chrysostom (in Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Χρυσόστομος) Born 349 – Died 14 September 407), Archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities. The…

The Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition in Jerusalem on Mt. Zion

The Abbey of the Dormition is an abbey and the name of a Benedictine community in Jerusalem on Mt. Zion just outside the walls of the Old City near the Zion Gate. Between 1998 and 2006 the community was known as the Abbey of Hagia Maria Sion, in reference to the Basilica of Hagia Sion…

Pope Benedict XVI: Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger

Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: Benedictus XVI; Italian: Benedetto XVI; German: Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger; 16 April 1927) served as Pope and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013. Benedict’s election occurred in the 2005 papal conclave that followed the death of Pope John Paul II. The Vatican…

Amen: Behind the word and meaning

The word amen or ameen (in Hebrew אָמֵן, Greek ἀμήν, Arabic آمِينَ) can be traslated with “truth” or “truly”. The specific Hebrew word amen (’amen ) appears to be derived from a related verb ’aman , which means “he confirmed, supported, or upheld.” This verb is also associated with the Hebrew word for truth (’emet…

Praise be to GOD: Alleluia and AlhamduLILLAH

Praise be to GOD is used to express happiness or relief when something good happen. (example: “You made it here safely. Praise be to GOD). Jews, Christians and Muslims have a very similar yet very different traditions, in all three Faiths the expression is very weel known. Jew and Christian Tradition: Hallelujah is an English…

20 Prophets that everybody should know

The Prophet is an individual regarded as being in contact with a Divine Being and said to speak on that Entity’s behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people. The Message that the Prophet conveys is called a prophecy, which transports a Message beyond…

Melchizedek: King of righteousness

Melchizedek, Melkisetek, or Malki Tzedek (/mɛlˈkɪzədɛk/; Hebrew: מַלְכִּי־צֶדֶֿק‬ malkī-ṣeḏeq, “king of righteousness”), was the King of Salem and priest of El Elyon (“GOD Most High”) mentioned in the 14th chapter of the Book of Genesis. He brings out bread and wine and blesses Abram and El Elyon, Elohim. Chazalic literature—specifically Targum Jonathan, Targum Yerushalmi, and…

Clerical celibacy in Catholic Church

Clerical celibacy is the discipline within the Catholic Church by which only unmarried men are ordained to the episcopate, to the priesthood (as a rule to which exceptions are sometimes made for individuals) in some autonomous particular Churches, and similarly to the diaconate, though in this last case exceptions exist not only for single individuals…

The Golden Gate of the Holy City of Jerusalem

The Golden Gate, is the only eastern gate of the Temple Mount and one of only two that used to offer access into the city from that side. It has been walled up since medieval times. The date of its construction is disputed and no archaeological work is allowed at the gatehouse, but opinions are…

Parousia: Second Coming

The Parousia or “Second Coming” (sometimes called the Second Advent) is a Christian concept regarding the future return of Christ and his followers after his “first coming” and ascension to heaven about two thousand years ago. The belief is based on messianic prophecies found in the canonical gospels and is part of most Christian eschatologies….

Antichrist

In Christianity, the Antichrist (Greek: Ἀντίχριστος, translit. antichristos; Hebrew: אנטיכריסט‎‎) or False Messiah (Greek: Ψευδός Μεσσίας, translit. psevdós Messías; Hebrew: משיח שקר‎‎) is generally regarded as a figure of evil that will falsely claim to be the Christ (Messiah). The term Antichrist is found in the New Testament five times in 1 John and 2 John, once…

Kotel: Western Wall

The Western Wall, Wailing Wall or Kotel (Hebrew: הַכֹּתֶל הַמַּעֲרָבִי‎, translit.: HaKotel HaMa’aravi; Ashkenazic pronunciation: HaKosel HaMa’arovi; Arabic: حائط البراق‎‎, translit.: Ḥā’iṭ al-Burāq, translat.: the Buraq Wall, or Arabic: المبكى‎‎ al-Mabkā: the Place of Weeping) is an ancient limestone wall in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is a relatively small segment of a far…

First Crusade

The First Crusade (1095–1099) was the first of a number of crusades that attempted to capture the Holy Land, called for by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095. It started as a widespread pilgrimage of western Christendom and ended as a military expedition by Roman Catholic Europe to regain the Holy…

Jerusalem: The Holy City

Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‎  Yerushalayim; Arabic: القُدس‎‎  al-Quds [“The Holy”]) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. Israelis and Palestinians both claim Jerusalem as their capital, as the State of Israel maintains its primary governmental institutions there while the State of…

The Guide for the Perplexed

The Guide for the Perplexed (Hebrew: מורה נבוכים, Moreh Nevukhim; Arabic: دلالة الحائرين, dalālat al-ḥā’irīn, דלאל̈ה אלחאירין) is one of the three major works of Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, primarily known either as Maimonides, in the West, or by the acronym Rambam (Hebrew: רמב”ם‎‎ – for “Rabbeynu Mosheh Ben Maimon“, “Our Rabbi Moses Son of…

Temple Mount

The Temple Mount (Hebrew: הַר הַבַּיִת‎‎, Har HaBáyit, “Mount of the House [of GOD, i.e. the Temple]”), known to Muslims as the Haram esh-Sharif (Arabic: الحرم الشريف‎‎, al-Ḥaram al-Šarīf, “the Noble Sanctuary”, or الحرم القدسي الشريف, al-Ḥaram al-Qudsī al-Šarīf, “the Noble Sanctuary of Jerusalem”), a hill located in the Old City of Jerusalem, is the…

The Seven Churches of Book of Revelation

The Seven Churches of Revelation, also known as The Seven Churches of the Apocalypse and The Seven Churches of Asia, are seven major churches of Early Christianity, as mentioned in the New Testament Book of Revelation. “Churches” in this context refers to the community or local congregations of Christians living in each city, and not…

Plenary Indulgence

In the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church, a Plenary indulgence is “a way to reduce the amount of punishment one has to undergo for sins”. It may reduce the temporal punishment after death, in the state or process of purification called Purgatory. The Catechism of the Catholic Church describes an indulgence as “a remission…

Wandering Jew

The Wandering Jew is a legendary immortal man whose story began to spread in Europe during the early Middle Ages. The original legend concerns a Jew who taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion and was then cursed to walk the Earth until the Second Coming of the Messiah. The exact nature of the…

Shavuot (Pentecost)

 Shavuot (or Shovuos), in Ashkenazi usage; Shavuʿoth in Sephardi and Mizrahi Hebrew (Hebrew: שבועות‎‎, lit. “Weeks”), known as the Feast of Weeks in English and as Pentecost (Πεντηκοστή) in Ancient Greek, is a Jewish holiday that occurs on the sixth day of the Hebrew month of Sivan (may fall between 14 May–15 June). Shavuot has…

Mount Zion

Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן‎‎ Tsiyyon), also transliterated Sion, or Sayon, Syon, Tzion and Tsion, is a place name often used as a synonym for Jerusalem. The word is first found in 2 Samuel 5:7 which dates from c.630–540 BC according to modern scholarship. It commonly referred to a specific mountain near Jerusalem (Mount Zion), on which…

Misanthropy

Misanthropy is the general hatred, distrust or contempt of the human species or human nature. A misanthrope or misanthropist is someone who holds such views or feelings. The word’s origin is from the Greek words μῖσος (misos, “hatred”) and ἄνθρωπος (anthrōpos, “man, human”). The condition is often confused with asociality. A misanthrope is a person…

Bible translations

The Bible has been translated into many languages from the originals biblical languages: mainly Hebrew but also some Books in Aramaic for the Old Testament (Tanakh) and Greek for the New Testament (Septuaginta, LXX) The Latin version (translated from Greek to Latin) Vulgate was dominant in Western Christianity through the Middle Ages. Since then, the…

Passover (Pesach)

Passover, Easter or Pesach (from Hebrew פֶּסַח‎ Pesah), is an important, biblically derived holiday. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by GOD from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the “Passover” (“Passage”) from slavery to freedom as the Book of…

Good Fryday: Conventional day of the crucifixion of Jesus

The crucifixion of Jesus the Nazarene occurred in 1st century Judea, most probably between the years 30 and 33 AD. Jesus’ crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources, although, among…

Abrahamic Religions: Similarity & Comparision

Abrahamic Religions counts 3.4 billion believers in today’s World (more then 50% of the entire population) and are spread widely around the World apart from the regions around East and Southeast Asia. Those monotheistic religions of West Asian origin, emphasizing and tracing their common origin to the Patriarch Abraham and mostrly of their Holy Scriptures…

Number 7 in Holy Scriptures

Seven is one of the greatest power numbers in the Abrahamic Religion startion with Judaism, representing Creation, good fortune, and blessing. A Hebrew word for luck, gad, equals seven in gematria. Another Hebrew word for luck, mazal, equals 77. The Bible is replete with things grouped in sevens. Besides the Creation and the exalted status…

YHWH: The Biblical Tetragrammaton

Related Posts: GOD – ADONAI – ALLAH The tetragrammaton (from Greek Τετραγράμματον, meaning “[consisting of] four letters”) is the four Hebrew letters יהוה‎, commonly transliterated into Latin letters as YHWH. It is one of the names of GOD used in the Bible. The name may be derived from a verb that means “to be”, “to…

Abraham

Abraham (Hebrew: אַבְרָהָם, Avraham ; Arabic: إبراهيم‎‎, Ibrāhīm), originally Abram, is the Patriarch of the Abramitic Religion (and first of the three Patriarchs of Judaism). His story features in the Holy Books of all the Abrahamic religions and Abraham plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The biblical…

Thomas Kempis

Thomas à Kempis, (Thomas van Kempen or Thomas Hemerken or Haemerken, litt. “Hammerkin” (small hammer); c. 1380 – 25 July 1471) was a German/Dutch canon regular of the late medieval period and the author of The Imitation of Christ, one of the most popular and best known Christian books on devotion. His name means Thomas…

Lent

Lent (in Latin Quadragesima) is a solemn religious observance in the liturgical calendar that begins on Ash Wednesday and ends approximately six weeks later, before Easter Sunday. The purpose of Lent is the preparation of the believer through prayer, doing penance, repentance of sins, almsgiving, atonement, and self-denial. This event is observed in the Anglican,…

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday, a day of fasting, is the first day of Lent in Western Christianity. It occurs 46 days (40 fasting days, if the six Sundays, which are not days of fast, are excluded) before Easter and can fall as early as February 4 or as late as March 10. Ash Wednesday is observed by…

Messiah

In Abrahamic religions, the Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. Māšîaḥ‎), Christ (Greek: Χριστός, translit. Khristós), or Al-Masih (Arabic: المسيح‎‎, ISO 233: mahdī) is the one chosen to lead the World and thereby save it. The concepts of Moshiach, Messianism, and Messianic Age grew from Isaiah’s writings (4:2 & ch 11) during the latter half of the 8th…

Messianic Age

The Messianic Age (sometimes refered as Golden Age)is a theological term referring to a future time of universal peace and brotherhood on the Earth, without crime, war and poverty. Many religions (including all the Abrahamic Religions) believe that there will be such an Age; some refer to it as the consummate “Kingdom of GOD”, “Paradise…

Pietism

Pietism (from the word piety) was an influential movement within Lutheranism that combined Lutheran emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life. Although it was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism originated in…

Candlemas

Candlemas, also known as the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Feast of the Presentation of our Lord Jesus, is a Christian holiday commemorating the presentation of Jesus at the Temple. It falls on February 2, which is traditionally the 40th day of the Christmas-Epiphany season. While it is customary for…

Vulgate

The Vulgate (/ˈvʌlɡeɪt, –ɡɪt/) is a late fourth-century Latin translation of the Bible that became, during the 16th century, the Catholic Church’s officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible. The translation was largely the work of St. Jerome, who, in 382 AD, was commissioned by Pope Damasus I to organize the Vetus Latina (“Old Latin”)…

Septuaginta (LXX)

The Septuagint (from the Latin septuaginta, “seventy”) is a translation of the Hebrew Bible and some related texts into Koine Greek. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament. This translation is quoted a number of times in the New Testament, particularly in Pauline epistles, and…

GOD

Related Articles: ALLAH ADONAI YHWH In monotheism, GOD is conceived of as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith. The concept of GOD, as described by most theologians, includes the attributes of omniscience (infinite knowledge), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. Many theologians also…

December 25th: Conventional day of the birth of Jesus Christ

One of the most important Christian Holyday is Christmas, the day that remember the birth of Jesus the Nazarene. The night between 24th and 25th December has been used conventionally (about 300 years after Jesus’ death) as day of the birth of Jesus and introduced into Christian ritual. Studying the Scriptures of the New Testament…

Jesus

Jesus (from Greek: Ἰησοῦς, translit. Iesous; Hebrew: ישוע‎, translit. Yēšū́aʿ, lit. ‘Yeshua; “YHWH saves”‎; c. 4 BC – c. AD 30), also referred to as Jesus Christ, was a Jewish preacher and religious leader who has become the central figure of Christianity. Christians believe him to be the Son of GOD and the awaited Messiah…

Jubilee

The Jubilee (Hebrew יובל yūḇāl) year is the year at the end of seven cycles of shmita (Sabbatical years), and according to Biblical regulations had a special impact on the ownership and management of land in the Land of Israel; there is some debate whether it was the 49th year (the last year of seven…

The end of Papacy: Prophecy of St. Malachy

The Prophecy of Saint Malachy or Prophecy of the Popes (in Latin Prophetia Sancti Malachiae Archiepiscopi, de Summis Pontificibus) is a series of 112 short, cryptic phrases in Latin which purport to predict the Roman Catholic popes (along with a few antipopes), beginning with Pope Celestine II. The alleged prophecies were first published by Benedictine…

Pope Francis: The first Jesuit Pope in History

Jesuits are bound by oath not to seek higher office in the Roman Catholic Church, and now one of them has been elected to its highest office: Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Christ, Pontifex Maximus. Pope Francis, the first Jesuit to become pope, not only represents a paradox for the papacy, but also the larger…

Holy Scriptures

Religious texts, also known as Scripture, Scriptures, Holy Writ, or Holy Books, are the Texts which various Religious traditions consider to be sacred, or central to their religious tradition. Many religions and spiritual movements believe that their sacred texts are divinely or supernaturally revealed or inspired. History of religious texts The oldest known religious text…

Christianity

Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as presented in the New Testament. Christianity is the world’s largest religion, with over 2.4 billion adherents, known as Christians. Christians believe that Jesus is the Son of GOD and the savior of humanity whose coming as Christ or the…

Apocryphal Scriptures

Apocrypha are works, usually written works, that are of unknown authorship, or of doubtful authenticity, or spurious, or not considered to be within a particular canon. The word is properly treated as a plural, but in common usage is often singular. In the context of the Jewish and Christian Bibles, where most texts are of…

Bible

The Bible (from Koine Greek τὰ βιβλία, tà Biblía, “the Books”) is a collection of texts sacred in Judaism and Christianity. There is no single canonical “Bible”: many Bibles have evolved, with overlapping and diverging contents. Various religious traditions have produced different recensions with different selections of Texts. These do largely overlap however, creating a…

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