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Tag Archives: Abrahamic Religions

The Knowledge: ILM علم‎

Ilm (Arabic: علم‎ “knowledge”) is the Arabic term for knowledge. However central the idea of ‘ilm to Islamic intellectual culture, it was an essentialist concept, assumed to be a fixed and identifiable (if undefined) object or fact. It has a much wider connotation than its synonyms in English and other western languages. “Knowledge” does not  Full Article…

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Passover (Pesach)

Passover, Easter or Pesach (from Hebrew פֶּסַח‎ Pesah), is an important, biblically derived holiday. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation by GOD from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the “Passover” (“Passage”) from slavery to freedom as the Book of  Full Article…

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Abrahamic Religions: Similarity & Comparision

Abrahamic Religions counts 3.4 billion believers in today’s World (more then 50% of the entire population) and are spread widely around the World apart from the regions around East and Southeast Asia. Those monotheistic religions of West Asian origin, emphasizing and tracing their common origin to the Patriarch Abraham and mostrly of their Holy Scriptures  Full Article…

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Abraham

Abraham (Hebrew: אַבְרָהָם, Avraham ; Arabic: إبراهيم‎‎, Ibrāhīm), originally Abram, is the Patriarch of the Abramitic Religion (and first of the three Patriarchs of Judaism). His story features in the Holy Books of all the Abrahamic religions and Abraham plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The biblical  Full Article…

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Messiah

In Abrahamic religions, the Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. Māšîaḥ‎), Christ (Greek: Χριστός, translit. Khristós), or Al-Masih (Arabic: المسيح‎‎, ISO 233: mahdī) is the one chosen to lead the World and thereby save it. The concepts of Moshiach, Messianism, and Messianic Age grew from Isaiah’s writings (4:2 & ch 11) during the latter half of the 8th  Full Article…

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Vulgate

The Vulgate (/ˈvʌlɡeɪt, –ɡɪt/) is a late fourth-century Latin translation of the Bible that became, during the 16th century, the Catholic Church’s officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible. The translation was largely the work of St. Jerome, who, in 382 AD, was commissioned by Pope Damasus I to organize the Vetus Latina (“Old Latin”)  Full Article…

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