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The Knowledge: ILM علم‎

Ilm (Arabic: علم‎ “knowledge”) is the Arabic term for knowledge. However central the idea of ‘ilm to Islamic intellectual culture, it was an essentialist concept, assumed to be a fixed and identifiable (if undefined) object or fact. It has a much wider connotation than its synonyms in English and other western languages. “Knowledge” does not  Full Article…

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Aliyat haNefesh (definition)

Aliyat haNefesh is a sort of pilmigrage made usually on Shabbat day and Holy Days, when devotes marched with Torah Jewish people sing a verse from Tanach: “Ki mitziyon tetzei Torah, u’dvar ADONAI mirushalayim” (“From out of Zion comes forth Torah and the word of GOD from Jerusalem”). Purposely placed in the middle of the  Full Article…

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Misanthropy

Misanthropy is the general hatred, distrust or contempt of the human species or human nature. A misanthrope or misanthropist is someone who holds such views or feelings. The word’s origin is from the Greek words μῖσος (misos, “hatred”) and ἄνθρωπος (anthrōpos, “man, human”). The condition is often confused with asociality. A misanthrope is a person  Full Article…

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Ergo (definition)

conj. Consequently; therefore. adv. Consequently; hence. ergo: a Latin word meaning therefore or hence. Cartesio: “Cogito ergo sum” is a Latin philosophical proposition by René Descartes usually translated into English as “I think, therefore I am“. The phrase originally appeared in French as je pense, donc je suis in his Discourse on the Method, so  Full Article…

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Patrician (definition)

Patrician (from Latin: patricius) is a term that originally referred to a group of ruling class families in ancient Rome. Although the distinction was highly significant in the early republic, its relevance waned after the Struggle of the Orders (494 BC to 287 BC) and by the time of the Late Republic and Empire, membership  Full Article…

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Ecumenism (definition)

Ecumenism indicates the complex of projects and efforts for unify believers (more often called “ecumenical movement”) who is devotee to the same God, but often disagree on some interpretations fragmenting into different doctrines. Etymology: from Latin ←. Late oecumenĭcu (m), from the Greek oikoumenikos, (deriv. of Oikoumene; cfr. ecumene.) that is on the inhabited earth (oikoumene  Full Article…

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